Model & Strategy

Seed Global Health cultivates the next generation of health professionals by allying medical and nursing volunteers with their peers in resource-limited settings. Seed Global Health volunteers commit one year of service collaborating with local educators to enhance education and increase provider capacity where it is most needed.  Volunteers also provide direct medical care, strengthening the mission of education and mentorship. Seed Global Health’s greater goal is to help sow the seeds for a sustainable solution to take root, addressing the vast shortages of health professionals in many parts of the world.

Seed Global Health believes viable health systems and care delivery are central to reducing poverty and to ensuring that communities thrive. We are committed to being part of a much needed solution for sustainable, stronger health systems. Cultivating health systems and access to care is critical to the strength and well-being of communities and individuals together.

At a Glance
Founded: 2012
Health
Location of work: International, Africa
Seed Global Health
20 Ashburton Place, 6th Floor
Boston, MA 02108
Helping to meet the global healthcare worker shortage
Vanesssa Kerry Seed Global Health
Meet Vanessa Kerry

Vanessa Kerry is a physician and the founder and the CEO of Seed Global Health. Having worked in resource-limited settings for over a decade, she has witnessed health inequities in many places in the world and has seen how shortages of indigenous providers in their home countries contributes to those inequities. She envisioned a solution where the growing number of U.S. health professionals interested in global health could serve as educators and faculty in these countries to build a pipeline of in-country providers.

Concurrent with her CEO role, Dr. Kerry is a physician at Massachusetts General Hospital and helps lead educational activities at the hospital’s Center for Global Health. Academically, she spearheads the program in Global Public Policy and Social Change in the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Her work has included the grassroots effort which led to Seed Global Health, and policy initiatives in Rwanda, as well as looking at novel ways for U.S. foreign assistance to fund health efforts, which improve efficiency of aid delivery, develop capacity, and enhance national sovereignty. Prominent publications include “An International Service Corps for Health: A New Prescription for Diplomacy” in the New England Journal of Medicine and “…One for Doctors Too,” a New York Times opinion piece published in 2010.

IMPACT

In the last five years, Seed has helped train over 16,200 physicians, nurses, and other health care professionals in Sub-Saharan Africa which faces a healthcare worker shortage; the region has 24% of the global burden of disease, but only 3% of the global health workforce and only 1% of the world’s health expenditure.

In five years, Seed has deployed 191 health professionals. They have served as faculty at 27 academic institutions (in 39 sites) in 5 countries, helped improve retention of health professionals, and impacted over 100,000 patient lives.

  • RT @FHWCoalition: Meet some of the people working on the front lines to fight and contain #Ebola in the #DRC—like Claude, a health worker f…
  • RT @VBKerry: Congrats to @P_Yerramilli for her concise review of #PHEIC and how we should approach outbreaks. Controlling Ebola Requires A…
  • RT @IntraHealth: It's #WorldHumanitarianDay! #HealthWorkers = the ultimate humanitarians. #WomenHumanitarians make up 70% of the health wor…
  • RT @DrTedros: We now have an #Ebola vaccine that is more than 97% effective and treatments that are more than 90% effective if used early e…
  • Thank you @BankofAmerica for being a long-time Seed Global Health supporter and for your unwavering commitment to c… https://t.co/3SuUJIzJDR
  • RT @VBKerry: Thank you @TakedaPharma for supporting @Seed_Global work to ensure countries have all the healthcare workers they need. Invest…
  • RT @rajpanjabi: @VBKerry @Seed_Global made a powerful case today for investing in health workers. Survival increases for mothers and childr…
  • Communities are the greatest asset in strengthening primary health care. We must invest in them to ensure we can ac… https://t.co/4ZQG0lBE0h
  • RT @WHOUganda: Ministry of Health is committed to addressing the major causes of maternal and neonatal mortality by skilled health workers…
  • RT @WHOUganda: “We need to focus on actions that will produce results. We should responsive service delivery especially focusing on reachin…
  • The Annual #RMNCAH Assembly is underway. Glad to be a part of and partner with @MinofHealthUG on the Symposium and… https://t.co/BHoC90345b
  • RT @MinofHealthUG: Annual Reproductive Maternal Newborn Child and Adolescent Health Assembly 2019 underway under the theme “Better accounta…
  • RT @JustineAthieno: Grateful for the opportunity to talk about the contribution of Emergency Medicine towards Maternal and Child health #R…
  • Dr. @JustineAthieno, our #Uganda advisory board member talks to #RMNCAH2019 participants about emergency care withi… https://t.co/3wwEWprvsX
  • Day 2 of #RMNCAH2019 is underway. Our Nursing Advisor Irene Atuhairwe talks to a participant about our work around… https://t.co/Alj9jXtEOz
  • Prof. Edward Kumakech, a dean at our partner institution, Lira University, presents on our partnership to enhance… https://t.co/xK9endTowW
  • RT @UNFPAUganda: #RMNCAH2019 syposium highlights adolescent and unintended pregnancies as one of the key factors hindering potentials, heal…
  • RT @UNFPAUganda: Investing in adolescent health brings triple divident of health benefits; greater public health, economic & demographic be…
  • Ready for the start of #RMNCAH2019 in Kampala. Looking forward to learning more about how we can help end preventab… https://t.co/klc4Axv7aL
  • Glad to support the continuous learning and training of health students! #ECU19 https://t.co/vh4ELeeskZ